Archive for month: August, 2015

The Mind’s Guide to Disc Golf

By: Drew Gardner

“The Best Time to Play is Now”

Though it is easy to write these things in a blog, the tips I provide will only work if they become habit. The essence of change is one of the hardest things that happens in the human mind. If you can discipline your mind to “walk the talk,” you can ultimately be successful in disc golf as well as life. Changing habits takes time and the journey is more challenging than the discipline itself. So take the challenge of personal change and don’t look back. The results may blow your mind.

You hear all the pros in any golf sport say, “you just play shot to shot,” or “take it one shot at a time.” It sounds so cliché, like it’s that easy. But what I hope you come to realize is that it is just that easy. The discipline is what is hard. Remember the last blog where I told you not to worry about things that you have no control of? This lesson epitomizes that concept. You cannot control time and in turn you cannot control what has happened in the past or what will happen in the future. What you do have control over is what is happening in the exact moment you are living…NOW! Teach yourself this concept and you will master your game of disc golf. I like to play with an extreme case of short term memory loss. Most great tournament rounds that I’ve played have a five on the card, or a couple of bogies. A lot of the times my next hole, after a bad one, is a birdie. My favorite example came to me in a doubles tournament that I played with my girlfriend, Jess. Our first hole of the event was a double bogie 5! Boo, what a way to start a round…next hole, bang the chains an ace! The 5 had been erased from my mind before the next shot, had not served as a hindrance, and I reaped the greatest reward – a tournament ace!

When I play at the top of my game, I don’t remember most of my round and it feels effortless. I have to think deep into the memory of my body to recall the shots of my round. This is mastery of this paradigm. Live in the moment and recognize that you can’t hold onto a bad shot. The first step is to bring past moments into your consciousness. Once you have, stop them by taking a breath and focusing on the next shot. This process will take time and you will only notice it a few times at first. Maybe only 3 or 4 times per round, until you shoot the best round of your life, effortlessly.

Apply this lesson to your life and let the disc golf course become a practice ground for everything that you do. Sometimes we let something out of our control have a negative effect on us for an entire day, week or even longer! Remember, if it happened in the past, we cannot control it now. Live that line and repeat it often. Let that weight fall off your shoulders and bring your total energy and focus on the now. You won’t regret it!

Join me next week for: “Practical Dreamers do not Quit”

The Mind’s Guide to Disc Golf

By: Drew Gardner

“Your Mind is Your Strongest Disc Golf Muscle”
Though it is easy to write these things in a blog, the tips I provide will only work if they become habit. The essence of change is one of the hardest things that happens in a human’s mind. If you can discipline your mind to “walk the talk,” you can ultimately be successful in disc golf as well as life. Changing habits takes time and the journey is more challenging than the discipline itself.
So take the challenge of personal change and don’t look back. The results may blow your mind.
If we take a look at a player like Paul McBeth, he has it all: skill, dedication, passion, drive etc… the one thing easy to overlook is his ability to utilize his mind in difficult situations. He doesn’t deviate from his mental game plan. No matter what the situation, he has the ability to think clearly and make decisions based on visualization of the final outcome. So often our personal decisions on and off the course are determined by outside influences. How you did on your last throw, how other players are doing, my boss is a jerk. If we can learn to keep clear focus we can all achieve our goals. As we develop as players it is easy at first to blame poor performance on outside forces, but we need to look within. We all possess one ability which no one can take away. That is, we have control of our mind. If we take the time to acknowledge this fact then our mental development will happen in strides. We can be reactive or proactive. A reactive player looks for reasons why they are not successful in which they have no power to change. A proactive player looks for solutions that they can change, they ask for help from players with more experience and don’t shy away from adverse situations. The self becomes open to change and the mind follows. Take time during your next round to notice these situations and change what you can. Leave things that you can’t change behind and move on. Apply these tactics to your personal and professional lives as well. Always remember that change takes time and can be a trying pursuit, but if you can address the small things first, the bigger things will have no choice but to follow.
Join me next week: “The Best Time to Play is in the Moment”