The Mind’s Guide to Disc Golf

By: Drew Gardner

“Your Mind is Your Strongest Disc Golf Muscle”
Though it is easy to write these things in a blog, the tips I provide will only work if they become habit. The essence of change is one of the hardest things that happens in a human’s mind. If you can discipline your mind to “walk the talk,” you can ultimately be successful in disc golf as well as life. Changing habits takes time and the journey is more challenging than the discipline itself.
So take the challenge of personal change and don’t look back. The results may blow your mind.
If we take a look at a player like Paul McBeth, he has it all: skill, dedication, passion, drive etc… the one thing easy to overlook is his ability to utilize his mind in difficult situations. He doesn’t deviate from his mental game plan. No matter what the situation, he has the ability to think clearly and make decisions based on visualization of the final outcome. So often our personal decisions on and off the course are determined by outside influences. How you did on your last throw, how other players are doing, my boss is a jerk. If we can learn to keep clear focus we can all achieve our goals. As we develop as players it is easy at first to blame poor performance on outside forces, but we need to look within. We all possess one ability which no one can take away. That is, we have control of our mind. If we take the time to acknowledge this fact then our mental development will happen in strides. We can be reactive or proactive. A reactive player looks for reasons why they are not successful in which they have no power to change. A proactive player looks for solutions that they can change, they ask for help from players with more experience and don’t shy away from adverse situations. The self becomes open to change and the mind follows. Take time during your next round to notice these situations and change what you can. Leave things that you can’t change behind and move on. Apply these tactics to your personal and professional lives as well. Always remember that change takes time and can be a trying pursuit, but if you can address the small things first, the bigger things will have no choice but to follow.
Join me next week: “The Best Time to Play is in the Moment”

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